Sea Animals Have a Symbiotic Relationship As They Host Parasites According To Their Own

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In over 15 decades of diving, I hadn’t ever seen such a massive whale shark. The feminine who swam before me only off the coast of Baja California, Mexico, was over 40 ft long and seemed pregnant with a bloated stomach. However, the best bit was yet to come.

After I finally got close enough for her by peacefully swimming through the water, I realized that this glorious lady had rather a surprise lurking within her huge mouth. It had been filled with remoras, or suckerfish since they are sometimes called. These fish have a symbiotic relationship that has many large sea creatures since they wash the host skin of parasites and consume left-over bits of food.

As I got closer, I stumbled across 50 suckerfish within the whale shark’s mouth and spotted several on her bottom. I left a split-second decision I needed to find a picture of the unbelievable moment. It took several attempts to catch the royal giant along with her mouth open but I got the picture I was after. You may view each of the remoras indoors and that I was so satisfied with the outcome. The picture, taken in June this year, proceeded to evaluate the grand prize of Scuba Diving Magazine’s 2020 Throughout Your Lens underwater photography competition. I could not quite believe I’d won as a number of my favourite underwater photographers were competing. I felt so honoured.

 

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Did you know that the Oceanic Sunfish, mola alexandrini is the heaviest bony fish of all ? Great photo 📷 from @luca_vaime go send him some love ❤️ ・・・ Have you ever seen a Sunfish underwater ? The Oceanic Sunfish – Mola Alexandrini. Starting from the month of July until October, it is possible to see more often the elusive oceanic sunfish in Bali. In this picture you can see how the fish like to get in shallower waters to have the coral fish coming and eating parasites off its skin. This picture was take. At -45m in 19degree centigrade at Crystal Bay in Nusa Penida island – Bali. #underwater #sunfish #underwaterphotography #bigoceananimals #paditv #underwaterphotography #naturephotography #beautifulearth #scuba #diving #oceanlife #saltlife #sealife #marinelife #theocean #fish #bigfish

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I am 32 today and originally from France but I got to diving once I was 14 years old while on vacation with my family on the island of Corsica in the Mediterranean. Underwater photography became a fire in my 20s but within the last couple of decades, I have taken it seriously and spent inappropriate gear. I use a Sony Alpha A7RIII, which retails for approximately $2,000 fresh (roughly #1,800), and that I keep it secure in a unique underwater housing. I change between a few lenses based on the sort of shot I am trying to get. While my whale shark experience was amazing, a true highlight of my diving career was the very first time that I got to swim with orcas. I like apex predators, and orcas are the kings and queens of this sea. Striped marlin can also be excellent areas to photograph, together with exceptional attributes and intriguing behaviour.

However, when it comes to my favourite monster, it needs to be a shark. They’ve fascinated me since I was a child and I’ve committed my entire life and livelihood to the species. In my mind, sharks symbolize perfection. They’ve developed more than 420 million decades, which I find unbelievable. For more than ten decades now, I have been lucky enough to spend virtually daily at the water with various species of bees and I wouldn’t change that for anything else on the planet. I’ve been involved with different conservation projects and once spent a year living on the small island of Malapascua from the Philippines where I worked with a team researching the behaviour of thresher sharks. We also looked at the effect of tourism on this distinctive location. Now I run my shark diving firm, which will be located in Los Cabos, Mexico.

 

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Mobula rays hunting anchovies in Raja Ampat Indonesia. I have just completed my first liveaboard trip in Raja Ampat of 2019. If you were asking me what is the one thing that I wished to see ahead of my trip, this was it! I feel so stoked and probably one of the most exciting dive I have had in Indonesia. The mobulas where coming in as a squadron of 30 and shoot themselves at incredible speed into the baitball. It was so exciting that I did not want to come up!! #mobula #rajaampat #indonesia #underwater #scuba #diving #uwphoto #rays #underwaterphotography #underwaterphoto #divewiththetribe #underwatertribe #oceanlife #saltlife #sealife #divinglife #scubalife #underwaterlife #lovediving #oceanlove #divemag #instadive #wildlife

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We’ve got a range of unique excursions running throughout the entire year, such as dives with hammerheads, makos, and silkies. Among the most special encounters is that the unbelievable Mexican sardine run — if the fish travelling in enormous numbers for security, which occurs from mid-October towards the end of November. We constantly secure mind-blowing pictures of tens of thousands of fish swirling in giant lure balls. Fortunately, Covid-19 has not affected us like a company, as we conduct trips with small groups. I took the picture of the whale shark towards the pandemic; I had been on a special trip to record the effects that decreased marine traffic, brought on by a coronavirus that was having on marine life. Following an hour of swimming with a massive faculty of silky snakes, the captain of this ship shouted’whale shark ‘ and there she was.

Although I have been diving for quite a while, I feel as I have just scratched the surface when it comes to researching the sea. There’s simply a lot to see, and once it comes to living my fantasy, I’d love to spare dive with a fantastic white shark at which I reside in California. The seas around here are full of them and the visibility is superb. For others expecting to get into underwater pictures, my very first bit of information is to be cautious, since it’s addictive.

 

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